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Inbar Spector’s Autumn/Winter 2012 collection was as stunning as the previous one. Taking inspiration from the theme of fairytale and escapism, Israeli-born designer stays true to her airy and enchanting style signature. This year’s collection questions the limit of’ where skin ends and where body starts’. Fascinated by plastic surgery, Spector brings an ideal vision of the body mixed with the garment resulting from our constant dissatisfaction with our body.

Inbar Spector’s incredible complex pieces set off with transparent sheer crinoline skirts, beautiful corsets, aerial concertina detailing, laces, silks and intricate metallic patterns. Gorgeous headpieces made of precious stones especially created by Lara Jensen for the show came to complete the whole fairytale look. The other accessories were the shoes that matched the garments by its same sophisticated pattern. The colours of the collection went from smoked pink, light green and purple to gold and darker tones, a colour palette familiar to Spector’s utopian theme. Once more, Spector took us to a fairytale world full of fantasy dreams and circus clowns where escapism led the way. When the model immersed in a voluminous lantern-like shape of white ruffles marked the end of this spectacular show, the crowd was already acclaiming the amazing collection and talent of the Israeli-born designer.

Written by Coraline Chane

Photography by

Chloe Lock (full-length shots) and

Andrew Papadopoulos (close-up shots)

Ubuntu International Project’s Autumn/Winter 2012 collection shown at Freemasons House fused the techniques and traditions of South Africa in a contemporary collection of jewelry, dresses and slogan t-shirts from a range of designers working under the Ubuntu brand. The collection is aimed at developing, promoting and exporting unique South African designs creating a high-end heritage brand. The show featured collections from eight designers which included Clinton Lotter, Jose Hendo, Frankli wild, Africa Ceo, Ayo Van Elma, Zohi Taglit, Studio 24 and House j’ola. the designers reflected a southern African theme through the use of bright colors and African inspired prints combined with turbans or printed head pieces. The standout collections were Josi Hendo and Ayo Van Elma, whose collections encompased the African theme best. Elma creatively used incense sticks, nesting them in turban-like head pieces to further emphasise her African inspiration, whilst Hendo reflected the theme through his use of burnt orange, red and deep plum brushed suede dresses which were structured with sharp folds mimicking that of paper origami.

Clinton Lotter: Pieces of black fabric were latticed to create loosely weaved tops, revealing bare skin beneath black strips. The look was given a conservative edge with dogtooth embroidered pencil skirts and jackets in black and dark blue featuring geometric velvet panels. Croc effect patent skirts in deep wine shades and suede jackets with patent panels gave the collection an autumnal feel whilst Suede finger gloves combined with patent platform heels gave a lady-like feel. The stand-out piece was a black glittered to the knee dress with a deep v-neck and latticed black which exuded glamour.

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Frankli Wild: Wild’s jewelry reflected bright South African culture through its use of coloured beads in eye-catching oranges, reds and turquoises. The collection featured large oversized statement pieces. Traditional African beads were combined with shimmering coloured jewels and silver chains to make individual yet wearable pieces that were striking and bold.

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Josi Hendo: Hendo’s soft brushed suede dresses came in an array of bright African inspired shades. From ochre yellow to burnt orange to deep reds, each dress was as striking as the one before it. Dresses were folded and structured in origami-like shapes, this layering and folding of fabric gave the dresses and individual and quirky edge.

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Africa Ceo: Africa Ceo’s collection featured simple, plain over-sized black cotton t-shirts with inspiring images that were versatile and simple. This was not so much a collection, more an advertisement for the brand; however the slogans were clever and imaginative. This collection reflected fashion in its simplest form.

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Ayo Van Elma: Round hat-caps with incense sticks placed on them were worn with printed dresses and clashing bright jackets with large button detailing. Skirts made of fine cotton were voluminous with a puff-ball structure. Black, red, grey and powder blue embroidered paneled coat dresses created an intresting twist on African Fashion. Lace tights were worn with rope wrapped around ankles to add a modern fashion-foward edge to the collection.

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Zohi Taglit: Taglit’s collection centered on mini wrap dresses in red, white and black patterned prints with 80s style wide high waist silk belts with large round plastic fastenings. Red printed skirts were clashed with powder blue printed wrap shirts which were jeweled along the colar line.

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Studio 24: Flared cargo style trousers in mink and beige shades with patterned piping along the pocket seams were worn with shirts which were tied above the naval to expose models stomachs. The shirts came in prints matching that of the piping detail on the trouser. Paneling around the colors also matched trousers and added interest to the otherwise simple shirts.

House J’ola: J’ola’s collection was varied, with patterned dresses and jumpsuits made of soft silks featuring in a mix of contrasting prints and cuts. Some were bright and eye-catching in shades of pink and orange, others were more discrete with patterns printed in earthy tones such as beige, taupe and grey.

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Written by Grace Beazer

Photography by Andrew Papadopoulos

House of Revolution at Freemasons Hall showcased the Autumn/Winter collections from three designers: Delada, Zeynep Tosun and Nadine Merabi. Each collection reflected a sophisticated and elegant edge. Whilst some elements were similar in each collection such as the use of chiffon for dresses and blouses, the designers’ use of colour, tones and textures greatly varied, setting each collection apart from the other. Delada created simple, wearable everyday pieces, Zeynep Tosun showcased sleek and sharp tailored garments and Nadine Merabi, beautiful and elegant evening attire.

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Delada: Sheer black see-through blouses were styled with black body-con pencil skirts and sky-high platforms to form a sophisticated collection with a sexy edge.  A White shirt was worn under a black encrusted corset emphasising the female silhouette and adding an evening edge to the black skinny trousers that they were combined with.  Jackets with exposed zips and triangular folded collars reminiscent of the biker jacket were put with black skinnies and platform heels and gave the collection a rock chick edge. Dresses were of textured tweed with sheer, black, chiffon panels.

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Zeynep Tosun: Zeynep Tosun’s collection used autumnal colours, burnt reds and oranges were used in tailored trousers and jackets to create outfit combinations that were the epitome of sophistication. Tosun used thick Perspex plastic to create structured semi-opaque corsets in deep burnt red shades, these were combined with white shirts beneath and a tailored trousers. Shoes were silver patent with white rope detailing and pointed at the toe. An over-sized backpack in a structured leather was one of the more wearable pieces of the show. A white high collar tunic gave a conservative feel to the collection. Red blazer coats with leather panels added further emphasised the classic tailoring used in this show.

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Nadine Merabi: Nadine Merabi’s collection of elegant evening wear came in soft greys, whites and a beautiful lilac toned taupe. Lace was widely used in dresses and on the stand-out piece, a round neck, sleeveless dress with a lace top and silk maxi skirt which was gathered in a paper-bag style at the waist. Soft evening dresses in clean whites and greys were worn with simple satin tailored jackets and oozed timeless elegance.  Billowing, voluminous silk dresses in whites and greys with crossed over detailing at the bust were connected to choker-like metal neck pieces that were open at the front. Models had their hair styled in soft quiffs and the eye make-up was a soft pewter smokey eye complimenting the tones of the opulent dresses.

Written by Grace Beazer

Photography by Andrew Papadopoulos

Inspired by Princess Grace, Jeff Garner made impeccable used of saturated colours with a combination of midnight blacks, reds, pinks, and peaches – perfectly allowing the palette to contrast against pure white silk. Hemp wool plaid material played its role as a new, refreshed material choice while adventurous elephant-painted and dainty floral prints subtly infused into the collection. Menswear leant towards a modest side, but the female look portrayed an independent woman, particularly through the use of full, snow-white and soft-grey gowns and dresses, and tailored purple trousers.  Shapes were kept minimal and rather classical with less architectural challenges but worked in favour to allow focal attention to be drawn upon intricate details, high collars and floor sweeping hemlines, all of which further avowed a flawless romantic scene.

With an outstanding exception, Prophetik’s finale dress made use of antique, exquisite quilt work; formulated from silk, a vintage pocket watch, Jeff Garner’s grandmother’s aged quilts, and naturally shed black ostrich feathers.

Written by Unsah Malik

Photography by Andrew Papadopoulos

Marios Schwab’s Autumn/Winter collection today was a salute to great eras gone by with a show of dainty tailoring and vintage-inspired accessories. Using a format of clean, simple colours cream, camel, black and green. Schwab created some truly feminine and elegant ensembles with accessories dominated his collection through his inclusion of leather gloves, T-bar heels and most notably a stunning assortment of hats: ranging from 1920’s cloche style to those with a striking wide brim. Schwab added delicate detail to shirts and thin jumpers with intricately sewn necklines, leather panels and chiffon layering. Knee length skirts and long textured coats were repeated throughout the collection and the styling of simple ponytail hairstyles emphasised the ‘more is less’ theme. Schwab created a collection that truly portrays women as women: unapologetically feminine, elegant and indirectly seductive.

Written by Elle Jenkinson

Photography by Shahid Malik

Shao Yen’s autumn/winter 2012 collection was full of staple pieces of suit jackets, blazers and A-Line skirts updated with a twist. Inspired by British style, Yen combined countryside chic materials of tweed and knitwear, along with sport wear sneakers and jogging trousers popular in London subcultures. The mix resulted in classic pieces of sheer skirts, tailored pants and mixes of leather and shaggy fur. Key pieces included a black velvet cape with fur trimmings and leather panels, and a slouchy drawstring blazer with an orange fur collar.

Yen’s collection embodied the variation in British fashion and shows staple everyday pieces with his trademark experimentation with unconventional materials and form.

Written by Leah Sinclair

Photographed by Andrew Papadopoulos

Antipodium embraced London Fashion Week with a thoroughly English Autumn/Winter catwalk show yesterday. Australian designer Geoffrey J. Finch based his collection on the gritty architecture and urbanisation of East London, choosing to celebrate elements of England that the glamourous world of fashion sometimes forgets: “Olympic stadiums as well as pigeons, old ladies and tower blocks. A mix of highs and lows.” The pieces were a great mix of high fashion and easy-wear options, pairing together classic slit pencil skirts, leather, and fur with sport jackets and rain coats. Making the latter the focal point of each outfit proved a clever idea when embracing a typical English Autumn. Injections of sky blue, green, yellow and brown complimented the British climate and gave a retro, seventies feel into the otherwise simple colour scheme. Antipodium presented ensembles that are tremendously versatile and easy to wear while still being feminine – something all Brits can be proud to sport.

Written by Elle Jenkinson

Photography by Chloe Lock

For her autumn/winter 2012 collection, Italian designer Carlotta Actis Barone chose to honour the victims of the Shoa. A rather unusual theme for a fashion collection, showing that the commemoration can be expressed through any field and any support.

The show was well-planned: white smokes opened the catwalk. A dramatic atmosphere invaded the stage where the music and the slow pace of the models reinforced the tension in the room. Not just the collection but the entire show was a hommage to the victims of the Holocaust. Carlotta Actis Barone sees the dress as an expression of the Jewish victim’s dignity as human beings. Inspiration from traditional Jewish cape, as well as the shapes of the dresses and jackets, suggested the right to pray during these events. Pans of fabric around the waist gave the impression of a need for protection. Typography all over the body deeply marked the skin. The colour palette black, blue and purple reminded us of tragic social events. A choice for sobriety necessary to commemorate the Holocaust. Known for her collections based on social issues, Carlotta Actis Barone creates an A/W collection that forces respect by its theme and by her social desire to honour the victims of the Shoa.

Written by Coraline Chane

Photography by Chloe Lock

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Pour sa collection automne/hiver 2012, la créatrice italienne Carlotta Actis Barone choisit de rendre hommage aux disparus de la Shoah. Un thème plutôt original pour une collection de mode, montrant que la commémoration de ces événements passe par tout domaine et tout support.

La mise en scène était bien ficelée: des volutes de fumée blanche ouvrirent le défilé. Une atmosphère dramatique envahit la scène où la musique et la cadence lente des mannequins renforcèrent la tension ambiante dans la salle. Bien plus que la collection, tout le défilé entier fut un hommage aux victimes de l’Holocauste. Carlotta Actis Barone voit la robe comme une expression de la dignité des victimes juives en tant qu’êtres humains. Une peau qui les protège, défend et les honore. S’inspirant de la cape traditionnelle juive pour prier, les coupes des robes et vestes suggérèrent le droit à la prière lors des terribles événements. Des lanières de tissu autour de la taille donnaient l’impression d’un irrépressible besoin de protection. De la typographie saturant tout le corps marqua la chair au plus profond d’elle-même. Les teintes à dominante noir, bleu et violet rappelèrent des circonstances tragiques de la société. Un choix de sobriété et de tons foncés absolument nécessaires pour commémorer l’Holocauste.

Connue pour ses collections basées sur des problèmes de société, Carlotta Actis Barone réussit une collection a/h qui force le respect autant par son thème que par son désir social d’honorer les victimes de la Shoah.

Écrit par Coraline Chane

Images de Chloe Lock

Todd Lynn’s collection proved to be an exciting clash of historic and modern influence with pieces in muted colours emphasised through razor sharp tailoring. Lynn took a modern approach to aesthetics with extremely high collars – a classic design choice for him. With their angular shape but seductively low and narrow V, he’s created a perfect balance between masculine and feminine. Accompanied with sharp shoulders, a definite raw edge was given to his structure. The collection came in an assortment of majestic colours, mainly dark tones, but bursts of classic autumnal orange and jewel teal were included occasionally adding excitement and accentuating the quality of his infamous tailoring.

Lynn lists the Renaissance as part of his inspiration, which is clear in the simplicity of the designs and colour scheme. However, he gives his pieces a futuristic twist with an androgynous structure with inclusions of leather and fur “for good measure”, he claims. Overall his collection works effectively with his shapely shoulders and chic leather gloves being the instantly recognisable pieces for the coming season.

Written by Elle Jenkinson

Photography by Shahid Malik

Blogger Stella Katterman wears a Jonathan Saunders top teamed with a neon-green belt from Asos.

Rebecca Igor (centre) wears a Staple skirt, with shirt and bag both from Zara.

Jerome Lorico wears a knitted vest from his own label, Lorico Design.

Roisin wears Dawn Smith shoes from her Dawntroversial collection.

We couldn’t help but notice this bright green Cambridge Satchel bag.

Photography by Jack Grange